Accessibility Links
Quick Send CV
Cookies on our website
By continuing to use this website we will assume you are happy to receive cookies as outlined in our cookie policy
Accept Policy


Tagged In:  NHS

Over 80% of 32 key findings in the recently published 2016 NHS Staff Survey were more positive than last year.




The latest NHS Staff Survey was published in March. Despite recent negative coverage in the press about funding and workforce pressures, the overall picture revealed by the survey shows many positives. Overall staff engagement rose from 3.68 out of 5 in 2012 to 3.79 out of 5 in 2016. 75% of staff said they are able to make suggestions to improve the work of their team. 90% of staff felt that their organisation takes positive action on health and wellbeing. And the percentage of staff witnessing potentially harmful incidents is at its lowest in six years.



The Survey was distributed to over 982,000 full-time and part-time NHS staff across England, including doctors, nurses and allied health professionals such as occupational therapists, physiotherapists, speech and language therapists, dietitians and radiographers. Over 423,000 staff responded, 3% more than in 2015. The Survey results are used by NHS organisations to help them review and improve the staff experience, and by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to monitor ongoing compliance with essential standards of quality and safety.

Alongside the many positives there are areas of concern. Only 52% of staff are satisfied with the opportunities for flexible working. Work-related stress is at its lowest reported level in five years, but still stands at 36.7%. And there has been no reduction in the 15% of staff saying they have experienced physical violence from patients, relatives or members of the public.

Employment-related health issues remain a significant issue, with 25% of staff reporting musculoskeletal (MSK) problems as a result of work activities, a similar figure to last year. To help avoid staff sickness absences, many trusts now offer fast access to physiotherapists for employees with MSK injuries. In March 2016, NHS England announced a new £600 million fund to help organisations improve the support they offer to maintain staff health and wellbeing, including MSK injuries and stress.

"Perhaps surprisingly given the well understood pressures, it's encouraging to see that frontline NHS staff say their experience at work continues to improve, with overall engagement scores at a five year high," said NHS England Chief Executive Simon Stevens. "There's still much to be done to ensure staff are properly supported, and local NHS employers are now being incentivised to better support the health and wellbeing of staff."

The full survey results are available here.

Email a friend

Meet the Content Development Manager

Add new comment